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Behind the scenes: Getting wet in crazy April weather…

Behind the scenes: Getting wet in crazy April weather…

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Behind the scenes: Shooting editorial at Burggarten. Freezing while waiting for the crew.

Behind the scenes: Shooting editorial at Burggarten. Freezing while waiting for the crew.

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Frame(s) of the Week #15: Portrait of Asutrian violinist Lidia BAICH in her garden, Vienna.

Frame(s) of the Week #15: Portrait of Asutrian violinist Lidia BAICH in her garden, Vienna.

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Behind the scenes: Today up for some food subjects!

Behind the scenes: Today up for some food subjects!

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Frame of the Week #14: Portrait of the Austrian comedian and actor Andreas VITASEK.

Frame of the Week #14: Portrait of the Austrian comedian and actor Andreas VITASEK.

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Frame of the Week #13: Portrait of David Tavcar, design student at University of Applied Arts, Vienna at Artemide.

Frame of the Week #13: Portrait of David Tavcar, design student at University of Applied Arts, Vienna at Artemide.

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Frame of the Week #12: Portrait of Prof. Dr. Mag. Markus Hengstschläger

Frame of the Week #12: Portrait of Prof. Dr. Mag. Markus Hengstschläger

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Frame of the Week #11: Portrait of Gabriele HEINISCH-HOSEK, Minister of Education and Women, Austria.

Frame of the Week #11: Portrait of Gabriele HEINISCH-HOSEK, Minister of Education and Women, Austria.

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Frame of the Week #10: Portrait of Herbert Weidenauer, grower of young plants of all sorts.

Frame of the Week #10: Portrait of Herbert Weidenauer, grower of young plants of all sorts.

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"The parallel extends to editing—and this is why amateur photographers can be “better” than professionals. Pros must shoot and edit based on an exogenous—outward-oriented—standard. They have to provide pictures that conform to a standard, accepted idea of what’s “good,” so as to please their clients and their clients’ broader constituencies. Amateurs, on the other hand, beholden to no one but themselves, can afford to be much more idiosyncratic—as idiosyncratic as they like, actually. And sometimes, the more so the better. I’ve always considered it a sign of emerging maturity when a student first becomes able to reject conventionally “good” and “perfect” shots from the raw mass of his or her shooting, and begin to choose less perfect, less standard, but more personal and expressive shots to work with."

Mike Johnston (via photographsonthebrain)

(via photographsonthebrain)